To paint a snowdrift, stand knee-deep in snow.

Featured painting is by Stephen Quiller, (c) 2016, Flickering Late Light Along the Ridge Trail

It you feel the ice-cold snow in your boots, you know you are in the right place. This is the mindset of a “plein air” painter.

The phrase “en plein air” is French for “in the open air”. As an artist, it means that you plunk yourself in the middle of your scene. You are at the mercy of rain, snow, wind, bees, and more. But for the plein air artist, being immersed in the environment is the main thing.

The superbly talented Stephen Quiller, of Creede, CO recently said that one of the most valuable elements of painting outside in the open air is that you “start to see things differently”. As an artist, an environmentalist, and student of nature, Quiller is committed to sharing the fragile majesty and breathtaking color of the great outdoors with his students, art patrons, and the world.

When you paint outside, rather than in the comfortable confines of an artist’s studio, you begin to notice the light change through the effects of weather and time of day. You observe the outrageous diversity of nature in the awesome enormity of ancient structures like granite boulders, or in familiar elements like a bird’s nest.

painting of a nest hidden in weeds and grasses with a clutch of duck eggs.
“Judy’s Duck Eggs”. A watercolor painting by Jane M. Mason
wild-callla-at-big-sur
Wild Calla Lilies at the Big Sur, CA. Watercolor by Jane M. Mason, (c) 2016 watchingpaintdry.com

 

Contemplating, experiencing, and celebrating the natural world is the gift of being outside in the elements. As Quiller said, the rest “is all frosting on the cake”.

I see painting en plein air as a collaboration with nature while “reading” and interpreting the scene. For me as an artist, it also creates a “muscle memory” of sorts.

Even years later, when I look at my completed painting, I can recollect the bird sounds, wind, and feel of the sun on my face. I am transported back to my determination at that session to paint what I actually saw and not what I thought I saw.

“I prefer every time a picture is composed and painted outdoors. The thing is done without your knowing it”.              

American artist, Winslow Homer (1836-1910)

Quiller is a master of color.

Someone inexperienced with his style or point of view may find his paintings to be unrealistic. They may seem to portray colors differently than you or I might experience them.

Flickering Late Light Along Ridge Trail
Flickering Late Light Along the Ridge Trail- 22″ X 30″ acrylic and casein, by Stephen Quiller. (C) 2016. http://www.quillergallery.com  This painting will be exhibited in China in 2017.

That is the beauty of being an artist and specifically a plein air artist. Actively experiencing nature gives you the authority to interpret it.

When you stand knee-deep in a snowdrift, it can be a delight, or exhausting, or freezing.

And, I’ve found, as in this powerful brilliant painting by Stephen Quiller, it usually contains a visual surprise.

 

 

 

 

“All pictures painted inside in the studio will never be as good as the things done outside”.

French Post-Impressionist artist, Paul Cezanne (1839-1906)

You may discover a streak of sunlight in dark woods. Pink light filling the air. Or a sparkling pattern of glittery light dancing across the snow. That’s part of the fun: always learning something new.

You, as the plein air artist can interpret the color, light, value, and energy in whatever way you choose.

View of Dry Gulch #2
View of Dry Gulch #2- 34″ X 24″, acrylic and casein, by Stephen Quiller. (c) 2016. http://www.quillergallery.com.

 

Even if you are not a painter, my recommendation–as soon as you finish reading this–is to step outside and wrap yourself in the complexity and joy of being outside.

As Quiller says, “the rest is frosting on the cake”.




In addition to his wonderful paintings featured on his website, Stephen Quiller has a line of paints, palettes, videos, and books. He also offers a number of art workshops throughout each year. Please visit his website, to see more about his enthusiasm for the earth, painting and plein air painting. 

And, I invite you to visit my website to see my videos, paintings and prints available through watchingpaintdry.com. And watch our videos on our channel on YouTube  

 

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About artinthecenter

I am a lifelong artist having studied painting, photography, drawing, and other media, in schools in the US and Italy. I won my first art contest when I was five--at a museum-- and my point of view tends to be as a five-year-old creative child embracing life. Creativity is a core response for me. How can we bring the infinite knowledge and excitement held by our museums and academics into the heart and minds of everyone? There is so much to share. Let’s ask questions, and discuss. Follow me on twitter @janemmason. Check out all sort of artsy information at: www.watchingpaintdry.com +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ This policy is valid from 1 January 2016 This is a personal, educational, blog written and edited by me, Jane M. Mason. For questions about this blog, please contact: jane@watchingpaintdry.com. Sincere effort has been exerted to cite, recognize, and thank all sources of content, including images, quotations or concepts that are not those of Watching Paint Dry LLC (WPDLLC), including Jane M. Mason. If you feel we have included something in this blog that has not been accurately noted or recognized to be from a source other than the intellectual property of WPDLLC, please let me know and I will adjust the citation when presented with specific citation sources and details. As an artist and writer, a core principal of mine is to respect and recognize intellectual content of others. If you are interested in using concepts, photos or other intellectual property from this blog, please contact, Rights Manager, Danielle Raub at Hello@watchingpaintdry.com. This blog does not contain any content that is likely to present a conflict of interest, although opposing points of view, as long as they are respectful, are welcome. This blog does not accept cash or paid topic insertions. However, we will consider accepting and keeping free products, services, travel, event tickets, and other forms of compensation from companies and organizations. The compensation received will not influence the content, topics or posts made in this blog. All advertising is in the form of advertisements generated by a third party ad network. Those advertisements will be identified as paid advertisements. The owner of this blog, WPDLLC, is not compensated to provide opinion on products, services, websites and various other topics within the content of this blog. The views and opinions expressed on this blog are those of Jane M. Mason or the associates of WPDLLC. If we claim or appear to be experts on a certain topic or product or service area, we only endorse products or services that we believe, based on our expertise, are worthy of such endorsement. Any product claim, statistic, quote or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer or provider. This policy has been adapted from DisclosurePolicy.org. For your own policy, go to http://www.disclosurepolicy.org

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